Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Loom knitting "knit" stitch definition - let's clear some things up!

Let me begin by saying I am by no means an expert. I am merely sharing knowledge I've picked up over the past few years. I've technically known how to needle knit for over 30 years -- I learned when I was 8 years old or so. I did not, however, devoted too much time to needle knitting since there were many other crafty sort of things I was more interested in. Loom knitting piqued my interest almost 3 years ago and then I became a lot more interested in needle knitting as a result. I starting truly studying needle knitting and playing around with it so I could convert it over to the loom for my own personal use and to open myself up to more design ideas on the loom.

Over the past several years I have seen the subject come up over and over again on my loom knitting forums about the difference between the regular knit stitch, the e-wrap knit stitch, the flat knit stitch, and the reverse purl. To a new loom knitter, this causes a great deal of confusion! I know, I've been there! When a new loom knitter thinks they have things all figured out they come across a pattern that says they need to use the "flat stitch" and it then it says to knit in stockinette stitch (more on that later) and they get all confused because all along they thought they were doing stockinette stitch when they were e-wrapping and knitting off for row after row after row straight! Arrrrrrrrrrgh!

Just as with needle knitting, there are several ways to make a "knit" stitch in loom knitting. Here they are with a little explanation:

Flat Knit Stitch = lay the working yarn ABOVE the loop on the peg and with the loom tool take the loop and bring it up and over the working yarn creating a new loop (this can be a very tight stitch). Here is a video demonstrating the flat knit stitch on the loom.

U-wrap Knit Stitch = lay working yarn ABOVE the loop on the peg and
slightly wrap this working yarn around the peg and towards the inside of the loom. Take the loom tool and bring the loop up and over the working yarn (this is a way to make the flat knit stitch less tight). Here is a video demonstration of this version of the "knit" stitch.

Regular Knit stitch or what some refer to as the Reverse Purl stitch= lay the working yarn over the loop on the peg and with the loom tool, come from under the loop and snag the working yarn to create a new loop, take the old loop off of the peg and replace with the new loop (this stitch resembles the knit stitch created from standard needle knitting the most). You can watch a video of the regular knit stitch here.

E-wrap or what you may see referred to as the Twisted Knit Stitch =e-wrap all the pegs and then e-wrap each peg again. With the loom tool bring the bottom loop up and over the top loop. Video demonstration here.

All of the above "knit" stitches are used in combination with the "purl" stitch to create all kinds of lovely fabrics out of yarn!

The Purl stitch = lay the working yarn BENEATH the loop on the peg
and with your loom tool come from above the loop and snag the working yarn creating a new loop, remove the old loop and replace with the new loop. Isela demonstrates this stitch here.

When a pattern says to knit in stockinette stitch for "x" amount of inches you can use ANY of the above mentioned "knit" stitches (i.e. flat knit, regular knit/reverse purl, e-wrap/twisted knit stitch). You will want to use whichever one gets you to gauge on the pattern. The stockinette stitch is a series of knit stitches that produce a smooth fabric which tends to curl since there are not any counter balance stitches used.

To create a stitch pattern that is referred to as the "garter stitch" on the loom you will knit one row in all "knit" stitches and one row of all "purl" stitches. A garter stitch pattern is a bumpy fabric and is also a fabric that will lay flat since it is counter balanced from the knits and purls.

To do a one by one Rib stitch you will do the following: *Knit one stitch, purl one stitch, repeat from * to end of row or round. On the next row or round do the same. If you want to do a two by two rib you would knit 2, purl 2.



17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Well done! Thanks. I'll send looming newbies on the Yahoo groups to look at this. Susan B in So. TN

blueheron said...

Well done! Thanks. I'll send loom knitting newbies on the Yahoo groups to see your page. Susan B in So. TN

Lori said...

so helpful! thanks for explaining all this! and the videos are great too

Anonymous said...

bless you! I have been losing my mind trying to find someone to explain how to do these stitches! Thank you so much!!

Loraine said...

At last, all the videos and terminology in one!! I just added you to my favorites. Thank you

Cassie said...

Thank you. I wondered if there was an easier way to purl than to pull the stitch off and replace it with the new one. It seems like you would lose your momentum by having to do that. Although I haven't tried it yet-it just looks cumbersome.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much! You are right about a newbie's viewpoint on different terminology referrencing the 'this-stitch' and the 'that-stitch'. Thank you sincerely for clearing it up and for being so concise in the explanation. ~MB, in WA

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much. I am new to loom knitting much needed info on stitches.

Anonymous said...

Thank you, I found a pattern with a few new stitch names in it, and your site quickly and simply explained the differences between them and the video links are fab, thanks!

cre8tivkj said...

You are welcome! I'm glad it was helpful :)

Siitin&Knittin said...

Thank you being as new to loom knitting as I am that was half the battle figuring out what on earth was being said and then how to do it. Kim in Pendleton Or

Siitin&Knittin said...

Thank you being as new to loom knitting as I am that was half the battle figuring out what on earth was being said and then how to do it. Kim in Pendleton Or

sophie said...

THANK YOU!!! THANK YOU!!! THANK YOU!!! I will recommend this site to any new loomers! Your notes & instructions were very helpful!!! I was so confused and after reading your page, I completley understand everything. It would be greatly appreciated if your could post pictures of finished products & the stitches used to them. I am having a hard time reading round loom patterns. Once again, thank you!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the clarification. Most instructions are very inadequate in trying to describe the stitches in writng and still pictures.

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much. I have a needle knit house slipper my mother made. Before she past, she told me it was "knit one purl one" for most the shoe. I wanted to make some of the shoe, but couldn't figure out how to purl. I am so excited to try now!

Kathy Todd Gleason said...

Thank you very much ,because I am The Same Way!! God Bless You:~》

Anonymous said...

This explains so much! I just started loom knitting a few weeks ago and love. I want to do more but was getting so confused. Just to clarify... when a pattern says knit stitch and the video shows a reverse purl stitch then I can use my usual e wrap stitch?